Monday, June 26, 2017

Peter
By Mary Kellet
March 2013
When I was 19 weeks pregnant, an ultrasound of my baby revealed markers for a condition called trisomy 18. We were offered an amnio, which we refused because we didn't want to risk hurting our baby. We were told we would have more choices if we knew for sure. We said we would never abort our baby, but would love him no matter what he had. We named him Peter. We were told there were no survivors beyond 2 weeks with trisomy 18 and that most people aborted babies like this. 
At 33 weeks I had an emergency c-section. Peter weighed 3lbs and 2oz. Peter was given excellent care until day 2 of his life when a FISH-metaphase test revealed he did have trisomy 18. At that time it was recommended to us that we stop all treatment, wrap him up in a blanket and let him die. We were told he would lead a life of terrible pain and suffering and would never know us or respond to us. My daughter went on the Internet and found many children living with this, some in their twenties and thirties. When I asked the doctor why he had lied to me, he said, "Well, how these children do largely depends on the choices their parents make for them." I responded, "How can parents make decisions when they don't receive accurate information?" He then said, "Well, we have to think about resources and you know Peter will never be able to contribute to society and will be a horrible burden to your family." I started to cry, because I knew resources meant money and it hurt so badly to have a doctor tell me my son wasn't worthy of the needed treatment to help him live.
Another woman doctor, who I had never met until after Peter was born, came into my hospital room and said she wanted to talk to me as a mother, not as a doctor. She
said that, if I wanted to be a good mother to my other children, I had to let Peter go because he would be a burden to our whole family and it would not be fair to them. I could do nothing but cry. 
We were told our son's heart defect was fatal. Something told me the doctor was not telling the truth, so we made our own appointment with a pediatric cardiologist who shook his head and said Peter's heart was stable and functional, but he did need a minor surgery called a PDA ligation. The doctor at the hospital told us that Peter was not a candidate for this surgery that was described to us as open-heart surgery. We were asked why we would want to put our son through that. It was not open heart surgery but a minor procedure to close a blood vessel. This is just a small example of the incomplete, inaccurate information and outright lies we received. We were pressured over and over to sign a DNR. We were even told we could not receive home care visits from a nurse unless we signed a DNR. I called the director of the homecare nursing program and asked her if this was true. She was flabbergasted and told us this was not their policy, nor had it ever been their policy. When I confronted the doctor about that she said, "Well they must have changed their policy." To which I responded, "No, it has never been their policy." 
We were very concerned about our son's welfare. It was very hard leaving him at the hospital knowing they felt as they did. We called the head doctor of the NICU at the U of M for a second opinion and shared our concerns. When the doctor at the hospital Peter was staying at found out, she was very angry. The next day she said we had 2 choices: we could take Peter home or we could transfer him to Children's Hospital. She had already called and they had a bed ready for him. She said we had to leave HER hospital. 
We decided to take Peter home. He only weighed 3lbs 11oz. He thrived on all the love and attention and grew and did many things we were told he would never do, like drink from a bottle and eat by mouth. He knew us and loved us, and we loved him. He was the happiest, sweetest little boy, who was everyone's favorite. He was never, ever a burden, only a joy and a blessing. He made us all better and taught us so much about love and compassion for others. He was the best of us. He brought our family tremendous joy.
Peter died at the hospital at the age of 6 ½ under very questionable circumstances. He died the day after having his appendix removed. We were told at the time of his death that he died because of infection from appendicitis and that his heart just couldn't take it. We had watched his stomach getting bigger and had asked if he could be bleeding internally. The doctor ordered an ultrasound, which he did himself. He told us all he saw was air. A short time later, Peter was dead. We knew something was terribly wrong, but didn't know what. We had an independent autopsy done. The doctor who did the autopsy said Peter bled to death. He had almost a liter of blood in his abdomen. There was no infection and his heart is not why he died. When we received all of Peter's medical records, we looked for the scan of the ultrasound. There was no scan, only a report from the doctor who did the test saying there was air in Peter's abdomen. We discovered later that the hospital Peter died at had an internal futility of care policy that the public does not know about. 
In England, right now, tens of thousands of patients with terminal illnesses are placed on a "death pathway" to help end their lives. In a letter to The Daily Telegraph, six doctors warned that hospitals may be using the controversial scheme to reduce strain on hospital resources. Last year The Daily Telegraph reported that the numbers being put on the pathway had doubled in just two years, with tens of thousands of patients now involved. But up to half of families are not being informed of clinicians' decision to put a relative on the pathway, the report by the Royal College of Physicians found.
Hospitals around the United States — nobody knows how many — have been quietly promulgating internal futility of care policies. I was reading an article written in 2006 by Wesley Smith, s a bioethicist, about futility of care. He wrote:
"If the principle is ever established that doctors, hospitals, and faceless ethics committees can dictate who can live and who must die, the already weakening faith of the American people in their health-care system will be seriously undermined and the door will be thrown wide-open to medical decision-making based on discriminatory hierarchies of human worth." [Emphasis added.] As German physician Christoph Wilhelm Hufeland wrote presciently in 1806, "It is not up to [the doctor] whether . . . life is happy or unhappy, worthwhile or not, and should he incorporate these perspectives into his trade . . . the doctor could well become the most dangerous person in the state."
Was my beloved son Peter a victim of the hospital's internal futility of care policy? Did someone make a decision to let him bleed to death based on a "discriminatory hierarchy of human worth?" Was his life deemed not worthy of the most basic treatment because he was a little boy with a disability who, in some minds, would never be able to contribute to society? 
On the one-year anniversary of his death, his 10 siblings, 13 nieces, nephews, other family, and 5 Catholic priests got together to celebrate Peter's life and remember all he did for all of us. Every person there and many more could tell you how this sweet little boy contributed. He made his family and all of those who knew him better people. That's what these precious kids do that have disabilities like Down syndrome or trisomy 18.
Over 90% of these kids are aborted and will never have the chance to experience the love of their families and help us be more compassionate, loving people. Peter was pure love. 
These kids are teachers of our souls and the world needs all the blessings they bring us. No one should have the right to make treatment decisions about anyone based on policies that the patient and family aren't even aware of. Our family has to live with the pain of how Peter died, knowing very likely it didn't have to be like it was. We will always consider him our greatest gift besides our faith. 
About the Author: Mary Kellett is the executive director of Prenatal Partners for Life, a group of concerned parents (most of whom have or had a special needs child), medical professionals, legal professionals and clergy whose aim is to support, inform and encourage expectant or new parents.

-The support, information and encouragement provided by the PPFL parents is not meant to take the place of medical advice by a medical professional. Any specific questions about care should be directed to a health care professional familiar with the situation.

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Peter's Story

Peter
By Mary Kellet
March 2013
When I was 19 weeks pregnant, an ultrasound of my baby revealed markers for a condition called trisomy 18. We were offered an amnio, which we refused because we didn't want to risk hurting our baby. We were told we would have more choices if we knew for sure. We said we would never abort our baby, but would love him no matter what he had. We named him Peter. We were told there were no survivors beyond 2 weeks with trisomy 18 and that most people aborted babies like this. 
At 33 weeks I had an emergency c-section. Peter weighed 3lbs and 2oz. Peter was given excellent care until day 2 of his life when a FISH-metaphase test revealed he did have trisomy 18. At that time it was recommended to us that we stop all treatment, wrap him up in a blanket and let him die. We were told he would lead a life of terrible pain and suffering and would never know us or respond to us. My daughter went on the Internet and found many children living with this, some in their twenties and thirties. When I asked the doctor why he had lied to me, he said, "Well, how these children do largely depends on the choices their parents make for them." I responded, "How can parents make decisions when they don't receive accurate information?" He then said, "Well, we have to think about resources and you know Peter will never be able to contribute to society and will be a horrible burden to your family." I started to cry, because I knew resources meant money and it hurt so badly to have a doctor tell me my son wasn't worthy of the needed treatment to help him live.
Another woman doctor, who I had never met until after Peter was born, came into my hospital room and said she wanted to talk to me as a mother, not as a doctor. She
said that, if I wanted to be a good mother to my other children, I had to let Peter go because he would be a burden to our whole family and it would not be fair to them. I could do nothing but cry. 
We were told our son's heart defect was fatal. Something told me the doctor was not telling the truth, so we made our own appointment with a pediatric cardiologist who shook his head and said Peter's heart was stable and functional, but he did need a minor surgery called a PDA ligation. The doctor at the hospital told us that Peter was not a candidate for this surgery that was described to us as open-heart surgery. We were asked why we would want to put our son through that. It was not open heart surgery but a minor procedure to close a blood vessel. This is just a small example of the incomplete, inaccurate information and outright lies we received. We were pressured over and over to sign a DNR. We were even told we could not receive home care visits from a nurse unless we signed a DNR. I called the director of the homecare nursing program and asked her if this was true. She was flabbergasted and told us this was not their policy, nor had it ever been their policy. When I confronted the doctor about that she said, "Well they must have changed their policy." To which I responded, "No, it has never been their policy." 
We were very concerned about our son's welfare. It was very hard leaving him at the hospital knowing they felt as they did. We called the head doctor of the NICU at the U of M for a second opinion and shared our concerns. When the doctor at the hospital Peter was staying at found out, she was very angry. The next day she said we had 2 choices: we could take Peter home or we could transfer him to Children's Hospital. She had already called and they had a bed ready for him. She said we had to leave HER hospital. 
We decided to take Peter home. He only weighed 3lbs 11oz. He thrived on all the love and attention and grew and did many things we were told he would never do, like drink from a bottle and eat by mouth. He knew us and loved us, and we loved him. He was the happiest, sweetest little boy, who was everyone's favorite. He was never, ever a burden, only a joy and a blessing. He made us all better and taught us so much about love and compassion for others. He was the best of us. He brought our family tremendous joy.
Peter died at the hospital at the age of 6 ½ under very questionable circumstances. He died the day after having his appendix removed. We were told at the time of his death that he died because of infection from appendicitis and that his heart just couldn't take it. We had watched his stomach getting bigger and had asked if he could be bleeding internally. The doctor ordered an ultrasound, which he did himself. He told us all he saw was air. A short time later, Peter was dead. We knew something was terribly wrong, but didn't know what. We had an independent autopsy done. The doctor who did the autopsy said Peter bled to death. He had almost a liter of blood in his abdomen. There was no infection and his heart is not why he died. When we received all of Peter's medical records, we looked for the scan of the ultrasound. There was no scan, only a report from the doctor who did the test saying there was air in Peter's abdomen. We discovered later that the hospital Peter died at had an internal futility of care policy that the public does not know about. 
In England, right now, tens of thousands of patients with terminal illnesses are placed on a "death pathway" to help end their lives. In a letter to The Daily Telegraph, six doctors warned that hospitals may be using the controversial scheme to reduce strain on hospital resources. Last year The Daily Telegraph reported that the numbers being put on the pathway had doubled in just two years, with tens of thousands of patients now involved. But up to half of families are not being informed of clinicians' decision to put a relative on the pathway, the report by the Royal College of Physicians found.
Hospitals around the United States — nobody knows how many — have been quietly promulgating internal futility of care policies. I was reading an article written in 2006 by Wesley Smith, s a bioethicist, about futility of care. He wrote:
"If the principle is ever established that doctors, hospitals, and faceless ethics committees can dictate who can live and who must die, the already weakening faith of the American people in their health-care system will be seriously undermined and the door will be thrown wide-open to medical decision-making based on discriminatory hierarchies of human worth." [Emphasis added.] As German physician Christoph Wilhelm Hufeland wrote presciently in 1806, "It is not up to [the doctor] whether . . . life is happy or unhappy, worthwhile or not, and should he incorporate these perspectives into his trade . . . the doctor could well become the most dangerous person in the state."
Was my beloved son Peter a victim of the hospital's internal futility of care policy? Did someone make a decision to let him bleed to death based on a "discriminatory hierarchy of human worth?" Was his life deemed not worthy of the most basic treatment because he was a little boy with a disability who, in some minds, would never be able to contribute to society? 
On the one-year anniversary of his death, his 10 siblings, 13 nieces, nephews, other family, and 5 Catholic priests got together to celebrate Peter's life and remember all he did for all of us. Every person there and many more could tell you how this sweet little boy contributed. He made his family and all of those who knew him better people. That's what these precious kids do that have disabilities like Down syndrome or trisomy 18.
Over 90% of these kids are aborted and will never have the chance to experience the love of their families and help us be more compassionate, loving people. Peter was pure love. 
These kids are teachers of our souls and the world needs all the blessings they bring us. No one should have the right to make treatment decisions about anyone based on policies that the patient and family aren't even aware of. Our family has to live with the pain of how Peter died, knowing very likely it didn't have to be like it was. We will always consider him our greatest gift besides our faith. 
About the Author: Mary Kellett is the executive director of Prenatal Partners for Life, a group of concerned parents (most of whom have or had a special needs child), medical professionals, legal professionals and clergy whose aim is to support, inform and encourage expectant or new parents.

-The support, information and encouragement provided by the PPFL parents is not meant to take the place of medical advice by a medical professional. Any specific questions about care should be directed to a health care professional familiar with the situation.

Embryo Adoption

Embryo adoption is so important. This gives the child who was left a chance to be valued by parents. Embryo adoption is needed for thousands of people. You get to adopt and be pregnant at the same time. Beautiful. There are 500,000 to 600,000 children in storage. They need your help.  These children need your help. An adoptive family can become pregnant and adopt at the same time. These children need love and care. 

These children are never adopted but they are experimented on and combined with pigs and a little one years ago was combined with a jellyfish "to see what happens" and then they destroyed this baby. These dear children are harmed in the name of "science."  

IVF is not all that it seems. There are more children made in IVF than born. There are exactly 1,691,090 are taken from their families and the most terrifying aspect is that 23,480 were destroyed after being taken out of storage. There are lets say 20 children made in an IVF cycle.

What is the percentage of children discarded from IVF?
A spokesman said, "'IVF involves the creation of more embryos than are transferred to the patient so that the best ones can be chosen to start pregnancy."

These children are "created and thrown away on a daily basis."
Please visit this site for more information concerning embryo adoption and their site is called Nightlight adoption. This organization helps and sees the need for children who are left to also have a home!!!!!:)

Please see Embryo Defense for legal issues.
 http://embryodefense.org/ 

https://www.nightlight.org/snowflakes-embryo-donation-adoption/

"He defends the cause of the fatherless and the widow, and loves the foreigner residing among you, giving them food and clothing." Deuteronomy 10:18



http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2255107/1-7-million-embryos-created-IVF-thrown-away-just-7-cent-lead-pregnancy.html

Monday, June 19, 2017

Miscarriages

A miscarriage is one of the most painful experiences a woman can go through.  Miscarriage is the loss of a little one at his or her youngest stage.   Miscarriages are never to be minimized and if a mother has been made to feel that way, that is wrong.  As you have lost your child and are planning the delivery, if your physician has told you to do a D&C, may I encourage you to make sure the doctor has the child child naturally or c-section.  This procedure is truly an undignified way for your passing child to be born. I want to make sure that your child along with you get love and care through dignity and compassion. You can hold and hug and kiss your little one. A D&C cannot give you the opportunity to say goodbye outside of the womb.

Sunday, June 18, 2017


From stillbirthday,"One of the most common concerns among doulas and midwives who want to take the SBD doula training is a fear that they will not know how to support families enduring pregnancy and infant loss, when they themselves have not endured such loss personally.
Another common concern is the practical aspect of generating income.
 In part to address these valid concerns, stillbirthday is presenting a radical approach to the philosophy of teaching.
We believe that all SBD Doulas have something unique and valuable to offer, and we are creating a platform for you to present your skill set as an offering to other SBD Doulas and birth professionals.
Starting this fall, all interested SBD Doulas can join the Stillbirthday Global Network as a platform for creating, advertising and presenting your own seminars, virtual workshops and in-service meetings!
It's still under construction, but you can check out the progress here!



Thursday, June 15, 2017

NaPro- honoring families



NaPro Technology is the term for Natural Procreative Technology. NaPro is the new women's health service that is causing great success for women and families. NaPro addresses the causes behind gynecological health issues. NaPro technology cooperates with a woman's reproductive system. NaPro addresses health issues such as miscarriages, infertility, ovarian cysts, abnormal bleeding, and more. NaPro is about helping a woman with the reproductive health of her body. NaPro tracking provides information about normal events during a menstrual cycle. NaPro tech can identify root problems with menstrual and fertility cycles. Dr. Thomas W. Hilgers developed NaPro technology. It is a trustworthy and morally acceptable reproductive service. NaPro Tech is of equal or greater effectiveness than IVF in helping couples with infertility. Women can truly be a part of their reproductive healthcare. NaPro is being used to help in preventing some miscarriages and other concerns.

Friday, May 26, 2017

An Exceptional Life by Rachel Guy


Rachel Guy's Grad. Speech
Every life is exceptional whether healthy or sick or healthy, wanted or unwanted as each life is made in the Image of God and wanted by Him. He is a Father the fatherless. He does not forget the weak and makes them first in eternity.  

Monday, May 22, 2017

All Life is a treasured gift even when unexpected or sick:)

My friend shared this story with me, "I took a city tour in Buenos Aires. I had a very friendly taxi driver and we talked most of the day (I used my very broken Spanish). At one point, we started talking about abortion (it is illegal in Argentina). I mentioned the Down Syndrome statistics (a high percentage of babies who have Down Syndrome are aborted in the US). He expressed his sadness with me on that subject. Then, he told me that when he was a baby, his mother nursed him and a neighbor baby boy who had Down Syndrome. The neighbor had adopted him and was unable to nurse him. He grew up with the boy and now the man (who must be 50ish) lives in the same house down the street from the driver and my driver's children call him an affectionate term for "uncle" in Spanish.

Random story, but I thought it was too beautiful not to share. It's amazing to hear stories of genuine kindness around the world.❤️"

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Quote of the Day

Rachel Guy's quote for poor in utero babies, “We fight not that they may live but because they are alive."

Thursday, April 20, 2017

IVF-not a gift for all

    In our society, IVF is considered to be the greatest gift for families who are struggling with infertility.  IVF provides families who cannot conceive on their own with a child.  IVF  is touted as the solution for those that struggle with infertility to have a new found hope of having a child.  This is what our society proclaims about IVF yet many look at the end result without knowing the hidden facts about the process. Each IVF cycle is different and in each cycle there are a different amount of embryos made depending on the situation.

In some IVF cycles there are more babies made through the fertilizing process than born. There can be up to 15 embryos made.  As an example they may take up to 10 babies through a test tube and if they “supposedly” have genetic defects, they kill them.   A former IVF doctor shared that often when children have identified genetic defects early on in the test tube that often the children grow out of these defects.  There is an intrinsic devaluing in life.  Then the other 4 babies are killed by being flushed down a drain in the sink.  Then we have 6 babies left as an example.  
Now these parents are told they have “options” for their “left over embryos” such as one can freeze embryos for later use or one can can donate them to science to see “what causes miscarriages” in babies or one can donate them to put them up for adoption.

Freezing a child for later use can cause a mindset of viewing the child as property rather than as a person.  Live Action shared about a speech that Dr. Caruso( a former IVF doctor) did for Pro-Life Action League, “Caruso states that back then they would take early embryos and implant them, but that technology and treatments kept advancing and therefore embryos would end up being frozen at later and later stages of development. “As this was happening, we were beginning to leave these embyros in culture longer and longer,” he said. “[…] we focused on the babies. […] We never really thought much beyond that.” Dr. Caruso said that the children through IVF are considered “manufactured goods.”  Freezing a child for later use will just cause a child who could have a family to live in limbo and to cause you to keep paying for storage for this child that you may never allow to be born.  Our personhood from fertilization is lost through IVF. If you are contemplating keeping your embryos in storage for no purpose that, is harmful as this embryo needs a family and you are responsible to care for this child as much as the child you are not paying for storage.  You must see this embryo as your child and therefore not keep him or her in storage for no purpose but the cost to keep this child in storage annually is not a trade off for the gift of a priceless child being given to a family through adoption.  

     You see I think that IVF can become a price tag on an embryo mentality and a ‘left over’ issue and not a child and parent view point.  I want to give an example, imagine you have a 5 year old child and you can’t take care of them so you are given 5 options for their life.  You could first allow them to perish or you can donate them to research so this child can be experimented on and have animal cells injected into them or for your child to die so that his or her cells can be injected into a person for a view of ‘healthcare’ or you can give them hope of being adopted to an adoptive family.  This option is the true option as no loving parent would ever consider harm to their child so why is the child at a younger stage in life considered acceptable to put them in such harm through death or death of experimentation.

The second point in options for an embryo has more detail then known.  What occurs as these children are donated to science is that scientists experiment on these children.  Sometimes, they take parts of their genes as they kill them and then they use the gene also from an animal and put the animals gene in the children’s genes.  



  As I found on a website about IVF which shows in the following segment as entitled and shared about, 

"Embryo quality issues and IVF implantation or failure potential

Poor quality 6-cell embryo on day 3

Blastocyst transfer is a relatively new IVF culture technique that allows us to maintain high IVF pregnancy rates when only transferring 1 or (usually) 2 embryos to the mother. This results in almost no risk for triplets." These two comments degrade the gift of life!  First to consider a child “qualified” and to state regards to having two children implanted to say, “This results in almost no risk for triplets.”(http://www.advancedfertility.com/ivf-failed-second-ivf-success.htm)  
There is a loving ethical answer. You can donate your embryos for adoption! This is the most ethical response to act upon given the options for the embryos that you have.  This life needs protection and just as your 5 year old needs your protection so does this child and if you feel personally that you cannot care for this child then allowing this child to be loved by a family who can provide those needs is the greatest gift you can give to your child!  NEDC provides families with ability to donate their embryos and to have these embryos then adopted to loving families when the families choose their embryo.:) Also embryo adoption allows families to adopt children.
There are side effects to IVF such as:
post-traumatic stress and depression from failed IVF cycles, children who were created through IVF struggling with ‘survivors guilt as they learn that their siblings were either frozen indefinitely or destroyed.”(Live Action.org)
If you are considering either please look up Dr. Anthony Caruso, a former IVF doctor, whose story is teaching society what IVF truly is.

As we wrap up IVF’s reality I want to share with you some quotes and a story from a former IVF doctor sharing about a story of a woman who was chosen to have a ‘cerclage placed in order to prevent her child from being born too soon, but she asked her doctor to remove it because she felt she could just try again. She was okay with her child dying, because she would be able to do another round of IVF and create another one.”(Live Action.org)




Resource:






Friday, January 6, 2017

Pregnancy Resource Centers

Dear PRCs, I am a former NICU baby who was diagnosed with a poor in utero diagnosis. After three doctors told my parents to abort me and my parent’s strong fight for my life 18 years later, I am currently working on a pro life legislative bill and have two ministries.:) 
This is for pregnancy centers or others also involved in pro life in various ways!

IN order for more lives to be saved, please read the following. I wanted to mention some important aspects to possibly add to your center.:):)

1st: Education videos: If I have not already talked to you about Dr. Levatino’s, a former abortionist, abortion videos I highly recommend them. They are done with Lila Rose, the president of Live Action.:) These videos are extremely well done and factually done. Dr. Levatino speaks from a kind, caring and compassionate manner in these videos. These videos are presenting to these women through a kind heart and manner what abortion is. They are hearing about abortion from a man who did abortions himself.  He has a position to state about what abortion is as he has done them and understands.  He is a wonderful and kind man who cares. These videos are powerfully used!
 Dr. Levatino is so being used by God to convey the realities of abortion and my mom has shown these videos to several of her abortion-minded clients, and the impact has been huge. We only show these videos to women who are considering abortion (AM or AV AND those who have never had an abortion before). Each video teaches women about the truth of what abortion is. 
I know the most common abortions that we see at least at our center are the pill.
He has a pill video and more:
Here is the official website:

Secondly adding “poor in utero pregnancies” on your website: I find it extremely important that if you do not already market on your websites about being there for women who have a poor in utero diagnosis, I highly recommend so. I was on an abortion clinic website and they advertised themselves as "caring for families who have a poor in utero diagnosis." We must counter that and show families that WE are here for them. What I read on their website was horrid. They made themselves sound like a "loving and caring" place for families whose children are sick, and they offer abortions as the “solution.”  We must specify the poor in utero diagnosis so that they know they can come to PRCs. 

Thirdly, PRCs need to be open when abortion clinics are: We can never risk a missed opportunity for mothers and children to be saved because PRCs are not open when abortion clinics are. The PRCs are often closed during times when abortion clinics are open as during the holiday times and this is quite detrimental. If we are closed, they will go get an abortion. It is vital that these women know they can come and see us at anytime! I understand that staff need a vacation and humbly think in my opinion that we can rally the troops by getting volunteers to come in during the holiday break time vacation and even new advocates to shadow to see clients. I find it vital. If we are not open these women will have an abortion. As Abby Johnson a former Planned Parenthood director states about holiday break time vacation as I echoed, “I learned today that many pregnancy centers are closing down for the next two weeks. Okay. I get that people want a break or whatever. (my words change: need a holiday vacation.) But guys, the abortion clinics are NOT closing down. They will continue to perform abortions the days before and after Christmas. If they are open, then we MUST be open. We have got to find our sense of urgency here. And thank you to the PRCs who are remaining open during this holiday season!” Imagine a life saved the day after Christmas because our doors were opened! Imagine.... If abortion clinics are closed we are too, but if they are open we are too.
Lastly: I would be very excited to provide you all with a 100% pro life doctors referral list for your Pregnancy Resource Center so that you make sure that the doctors these women see when leaving you are affirming life as well and not telling them to have an abortion for any reason!:)

God bless you all,

Rachel Mary G.